Latvia First to Order Radars with New Capability; U.S. Army Orders Seven More Q-53 Radars

The Multi-Role Radar (TPS-77 MRR) is designed for ultra-low power consumption and is the most transportable version of Lockheed Martin’s successful TPS-77 product line. This high-performing radar will be truck mounted for operation at unprepared sites and can be dismounted for use at fixed sites. Rendering courtesy Lockheed Martin.
 

In October, a new version of the TPS-77 Multi Role Radar (TPS-77 MRR) was sold to Latvia. The TPS-77MRR is designed for ultra-low power consumption and is the most transportable version of Lockheed Martin’s successful TPS-77 product line. Latvia’s variant of this high-performing radar can be truck mounted for operation at unprepared sites or dismounted for use at fixed sites.

The radar’s multi-role single scan technology allows operators to select specific roles for the radar such as long range or medium range low-level flight surveillance (including helicopter detection) in specific sectors. As the radar rotates through each 360 degree scan, the system automatically adjusts to the operator selected mission. Changes can be easily made if the system is moved or mission is changed. Once set, no further operator inputs are required.

As with current production TPS-77s and other next generation Lockheed Martin radars, the TPS-77 MRR uses Gallium Nitride (GaN) technology. The GaN technology has already been installed and tested in operational radars.

All new technology delivered in the MRR is backwardly compatible with fielded systems around the world.

Lockheed Martin has produced and maintains more than 175 surveillance-range radars, all of which are operational around the world detecting targets at ranges up to 250 miles, 24 hours a day.  These radars are capable of operating completely unmanned and many have performed for decades in remote, inhospitable areas and in a wide range of operational environments.

No Lockheed Martin FPS-117, TPS-77 or TPS-59 radar has ever been taken out of service and the systems continue to operate well beyond their original 20-year service lives (many planned to operate for more than 40 years).

TPQ-53 radars detect, classify, track and determine the location of enemy indirect fire such as mortars, artillery and rockets in either 360-degree or 90-degree modes. Courtesy Lockheed Martin.
 

When troops need to set up and quickly track incoming threats, they rely on battlefield-proven 360-degree protection provided by the Lockheed Martin AN/TPQ-53 (Q-53) counterfire target acquisition radar. The Q-53 offers enhanced performance, including greater mobility, increased reliability and supportability, a lower life-cycle cost, reduced crew size, and the ability to track targets in a full-spectrum environment, a vital capability on today’s battlefield.

The U.S. Army recently announced that it will buy an additional seven Q-53 systems valued at $85 million, ensuring that the Q-53 continues to be the radar of choice to keep troops safe from persistent insurgent attacks.

The high-performing hardware and software is constantly evolving to accommodate technical advances in capabilities and address global threats.

"Soldiers can rapidly deploy the truck-mounted Q-53 and quickly determine the source of enemy fire," said Bob Stelmack, Q-53 program manager for Lockheed Martin. "The 55 systems Lockheed Martin has delivered to the U.S. Army give troops proven, advanced protection when they need it most."

The Q-53 can be automatically leveled and remotely operated at 90-degree or 360-degrees and operated from a laptop computer or from the fully equipped climate-controlled command vehicle.

Since Lockheed Martin won the development contract for the Q-53 radar in 2007, the company has won four additional contracts (for a total of 97) and delivered 55 systems on-time and on-budget to the U.S. Army. The Army is expected to award a full-rate production contract by early 2016, covering an anticipated 77 additional systems.